Mitchell Blatt Biographical Summary

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I am a writer and editor in China. I write about travel, culture, and politics for a variety of outlets, including Panda Guides, for which I have been the lead author of the Panda Guides Hong Kong guidebook and a contributor their China guidebook. I have also worked as the Foreign Editor for map magazine in Nanjing.

Here I am featured on Jiangsu Educational TV:

I have been living in China for over 3 years, since 2012, and have traveled throughout over 15 provinces. While traveling, I have written about Chinese culture, including the topics of lounge singers in Hong Kong, Hong Kong’s classic films, Occupy Central, education in country villages, ethnic minority festivals, and more. Many of my articles are available at my personal website, China Travel Writer.com, along with my blog. I have also written about foreign affairs and politics for outlets like the Shanghai Daily, China.org.cn, and The Hill.com.

In 2013, I was the lead author of the Panda Guides Hong Kong guidebook, along with three co-authors. With my deep knowledge of Hong Kong culture and that of the other authors, the guide includes “extensive Overview that gives you the low down on history, culture, language, holidays, weather, art, literature, film, music, architecture, economics and politics.” Learn more about the book at Panda Guides.com. I was also a contributor to Panda Guides China.

I also take photos while I travel, which you can view or purchase online: my portfolio.

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Some press coverage:
Foreigner’s view of Jiangsu launched in Yangzhong
Foreigner’s View of Jiangsu: Chinese Textile and Clothing Museum

Mitchell Blatt (Chinese name: Bu Hengli – 布亨利) almost caused the audience members’ mouths to drip. In his view, China is like an imperial banquet. “If I were a Chinese person, I would definitely be a Sichuan person, because I have the stomach of a Sichuan person,” he said. Blatt said he liked eating spicy food. His conclusion caused the judges to laugh: “There isn’t such thing as ‘too spicy’; there is only more spicy. There isn’t a most delicious; there is only more delicious.”
“Happy Jiangsu” Foreigners Speaking Chinese, Yangzi Evening Paper, June 11, 2014

American Mitchell Blatt (布亨利) has a special liking for Chinese food. He said he has already traveled to 15 provinces, and he described the cuisine in the whole country. From Xi’an’s biang biang noodles and Hunan’s stinky tofu and chicken feet to Beijing’s Peking duck and Nanjing’s boiled salted duck, he went down the list. Finally he said what he liked the most was Sichuan’s hot pot. “In Sichuan, my friends told me, ‘Mitchell, what you are eating is too spicy!’ I responded, ‘There’s no such thing as too spicy. There is only more spicy.’”

The Curtain Drops on the “Happy Jiangsu” Foreigners Chinese Speaking Competition, Jiangsu Online, June 11, 2014

 

Mitchell Blatt (布亨利), who recently graduated from Indiana University’s journalism program, has a dream to travel across China and write about China. “Then marry a Sichuan wife.” His plan is to work and travel in China.

He has a Weibo account with the name “Foreign Devil.” While Chinese young people like to share delicious food photos, his is different. He specializes in sharing questions like, “Who has watched The Wind Rises? I want to know what Chinese people think about this film.”
Dreams, Xinhua Daily, Aug. 7, 2014

 

I have been quoted as a travel expert in a number of articles:

For instance: travel writer Mitchell Blatt, who covers China, said: “Reclining is the only thing that makes economy seats a little bit more comfortable. Each passenger purchases the right to recline with their ticket, and the person behind them has no grounds to interfere. If they are uncomfortable–as are many passengers–they should recline themselves.”

“The Best Defense Against Reclining Airplane Seats,” Main Street

According to Mitchell Blatt, lead author of the Panda Guides Hong Kong guidebook, the most common scam in China is the so-called “tea ceremony scam,” in which a young Chinese person asks tourists if they want to experience an authentic Chinese tea ceremony. “Then they take the tourists to a place they have a relationship with, and when the bill comes, it could be a few thousand yuan — much higher than market price. This is particularly common in popular tourist cities like Shanghai, Beijing, and Xi’an,” he says.

“The 9 Surprising Travel Scams You Need to Know About,” Oyster